Tokyo flood reservoir

Visitors at the bottom of a huge underground surge tank in Kasukabe, north of Tokyo. Credit Kentaro Takahashi for The New York Times

By Hiroko Tabuchi, 

KASUKABE, Japan — The cavernous underground cisterns here north of Tokyo could hold the Statue of Liberty, a scale that underscores the site’s immense task: protecting the world’s most populous metropolis from flooding.

Linked by tunnels that divert water away from the region’s most vulnerable floodplains, the $2 billion underground anti-flood system, completed in 2006, is an extraordinary example of the defenses that global cities are readying as they face an era of extreme weather brought on by climate change.

See also:
https://www.wired.com/2017/04/christoffer-rudquist-tokyo-drainage-system/

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